Why Bitcoin is the Trade of a Lifetime #Podcast

Bitcoin and cryptocurrency and blockchain in general present a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to experience explosive wealth generation within an asset class that is set to not only disrupt the banking but also the legal sector.

Although investing in established asset classes are safer (e.g. stocks, bonds, and property) safer assets also have less potential for growth. It is unlikely you will make significant money in safe investments. Great wealth made quickly is normally achieved by ramping up risk significantly, e.g. through leverage or by shifting funds into risky areas, e.g. emerging and frontier countries as well as emerging and frontier technologies.

Blockchain is a frontier technology, a nascent market unburdened by excessive regulation or rent-seeking monopolistic entities. It will not be like this forever. We have already seen web, social media, and smartphone technologies becoming dominated by large companies that have laid in place the infrastructure upon which commerce in these areas operate, e.g. Google in web; Facebook in social media; and Google, Samsung, and Apple in smartphones. These three tech sectors of web, social media, and smartphones make up the bulk of the Nasdaq 100, an index that is now quite saturated.

Investing Under a Trump Presidency [Podcast]

I am certainly not a Trump fan. I actually find the man quite disgusting, and I watched in horror as he was elected President of the USA. That being said, the stock market boom following his election has increased my net worth considerably, and I expect more gains in 2017. However, there are significant risks involved in investing in American equities at this time, so while you should be exposed to the market to capture all the gains from this bull market, you must be prepared to exit the market quickly once it is clear the boom is over.

Other topics discussed in this podcast include Wall Street’s complete takeover of the White House as well as reasons why residential real estate is a bad investment.

 

My Thoughts on “The Big Short”

Yesterday I was watching a movie called The Big Short and it’s an awesome movie about the GFC. The movie makes me wonder about whether we are in for another financial crash. Stock and property markets went down about 50% in America and most countries around the world, but since then central bank injections of cash seem to have restored everything.

This movie blames the property crash on subprime loans, but at the end of the day subprime lending popped the entire American housing bubble. The bubble was there in the first place, and the bubble was in property, not just subprime property but also prime property, which is why property prices in the US fell across the board.

This movie also really exposed how corrupt and fraudulent the financial system is. The biggest injustice of all, in my opinion, is that investment banks created these toxic assets (CDOs, etc) and then when they were worthless they simply did a deal with the government to unload it onto the government in return for printed money (or bailout money). This pretty much means the banks can do whatever they want knowing that if things go wrong they can simply get the government to bail them out. If you or I started a cafe and the business failed, the government will not bail us out. However, this does not apply to bankers, the holders of capital. Capitalism, therefore, does not apply to capitalists. Bankers can create bubbles, create bad assets, and then sell these assets, and if everything goes wrong they can just tell the government to take it off their hands. There should be no bailout, and those who held CDOs should have been left to learn the errors of their ways. By bailing them out, you only reward bad behavior.

Looking at it this way, the banking industry is simply an arm of the government. Banks are simply government business enterprises.

The original view was that if the government prints money to buy these toxic assets off bankers, this would cause inflation, but these toxic assets are usually highly leveraged, and more debt actually increases the amount of the money in circulation, which is inflationary. As debt prices go down (e.g. there is a debt bubble that pops) then this means the expectation is that loans will not get paid, and the amount of money in circulation goes down, which is deflationary. The government printing money simply restores the money supply back to original levels. 

How to invest

My investing strategy is pretty simple. I’ve been focusing mainly on dividends and looking at funds that provide low volatility. The perfect ETF on the ASX, in my opinion, is Betashares’s HVST, which has a double-digit yield and pays monthly. It also uses derivatives to lower volatility by selling futures when volatility is high. If the market crashes, I’m sure this fund will go down, but it won’t go down that much, and while everything is rosy, this fund will produce great dividends, which is awesome.

If there is a GFC 2, I expect to take a hit. My net worth will go down, but I have been loading my portfolio up with funds that are designed to be low volatility (such as HVST) as well as other defensive investments like gold mining ETFs (ASX: GDX) as well as bond funds, and so if my net worth goes down, it won’t go down much, and when the market bottoms, I will definitely be plowing as much money as possible into leveraged ETFs expecting the government to print money to restore the economy. While the market is likely in bubble territory now, it’s also a good idea to keep debt levels low because a major risk when there is a market crash is that a margin call will be triggered. Keeping debt low reduces the risk of this happening. Furthermore, as the market bottoms, if your debt levels are low, you have more ability to take on more debt to invest when the market bottoms, which means you can leverage into leveraged ETFs and achieve “double leverage” to magnify your returns once central bankers start firing up the printing presses.

Bottom line is that at this stage you should load up your portfolio with defensive assets, e.g. cash, bonds, gold, as well as “smart beta” low-volatility ETFs, but don’t go all into these defensive assets because it’s almost impossible to determine when a bubble will pop. As they say, a market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent, so often when a bubble is formed, it’s often best to simply ride the bubble and make money, but always have a plan to protect yourself if the bubble bursts. There must be a plan B.

 

How to Invest Post-Brexit

The ASX200 went down about 5% after Brexit. A few days earlier, I purchased about $19k worth of gold mining ETFs (ASX: GDX). GDX went up 10% on Friday, so much that it made up for the losses from my other investments in my margin loan account. However, if you add up money in other areas, such as my super fund, my Vanguard funds, and so forth, I’m sure I made a net loss immediately after Brexit. I believe that there is a huge bubble right now in the economy caused by money printing. The economy is fragile because this bubble could pop any moment now, but it’s difficult to know when the bubble will pop. It may take decades before the bubble pops, so you need to have a strategy that allows you to profit when the bubble continues to inflate while also protecting you if the bubble pops.

What I am doing is focusing on dividend income but hedging this portfolio by buying gold mining stocks, gold ETFs, and maybe some government bond ETFs. I am less bullish on bonds because I think that they are artificially being pumped up with printed money. Gold is better as a safe haven asset compared to bonds as bonds are being artificially inflated by central bankers.

In my opinion, we are entering a period of stagnation similar to what we see in Japan where the stock market goes sideways and there is no more growth. We have reached the limits of growth, in fact. Investing in dividends allows you to capture income as the market goes sideways, and if the bubble bursts, gold will protect you. You are covered either way.

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What will burst the bubble?