Don’t be Desperate

If you’ve been to a developing country, chances are you’ve walked along the footpath and you’ve had people coming up to you trying to sell you things. As I was walking around in Kuta, Bali, there were many people sitting on stools on the footpath. These people look poor in that their hair is all over the place and their clothes look dirty. When they see you, they likely assume you are rich and immediately try to sell you something, and the immediately knee-jerk response is to just say no.

DSC_0803
Kuta, Bali

If a ship you are in hit an iceberg and everyone had to jump into the ocean, some people may have life jackets while other would not. If you had a life jacket and were floating in the water, but you see someone who does not have a life jacket and was struggling to keep his head above water, you’d be reluctant to help the man, not because you’re a bad person, but because you know he is desperate, and desperation drives people to do whatever they can to survive, and if you try to help the man, he may through no fault of his own try to steal your life jacket, and you may drown instead of him.

It is the same with the man trying to sell you things on the road. You know he is desperate. Chances are the products don’t have any price. There is an expectation that you haggle over the price, and you just know that he will try to rip you off, so the initial reaction is to just say no and get away. At least that’s how I feel.

The same applies to relationships. If you’re with a girl and suddenly she seems clingy and desperate, that is, she messages you all the time asking to meet up with you, then it’s the same knee-jerk response. You immediately try to distance yourself because you know that desperation drives people to do crazy things, and a desperate girl might pressure you into marriage or children even when you may not feel ready for that.

A relationship is like sales. When you’re with a girl, she is providing female intimacy, companionship, as well as other hard-to-define services, and you are providing something of value back to her as well.

The retailers you feel comfortable with are those that don’t push you overtly. When you’re in an Aldi store, you don’t feel any desperate person trying to pressure you into buying their almond milk. It’s there on the shelves. The price is clearly labelled. If you want it, bring it to the checkout and pay for it. If you don’t want it, just walk away. There’s no pressure on you. You can feel that Aldi is not desperate at all. Aldi is a huge business.

This lesson should be applied to your business and relationship dealings. Don’t be desperate because people can detect desperation, and desperation repels people.

When you are in a relationship with someone, don’t behave as if you must be with them. You need to have a life of your own. Don’t be desperate.

Even in your career you should not be desperate. Too many people, once they get a job, they buy a house and take on a large mortgage, borrow money to buy a nice car, get married, have multiple children, and go on multiple expensive exotic holidays, and these high expenses and high debts make them dependent on their job, and if there is suddenly a recession or if there are job cuts, they go into desperation mode, and employers can smell desperation. It is best to keep your expenses low and invest surplus cash so that you are less dependent on income from work because you are building up income from investments. Passive income makes you less dependent on your employer.

 

Why I’m Bullish on the American Tech Sector

Now is a great time to invest in the American technology sectors, for example, investing in companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft.

The internet is the next frontier. It is highly disruptive and will grow strongly in the future at the expense of many traditional industries. For example, the rise of the internet has destroyed traditional print news and media.

Are we in a bubble?

The price earnings ratio of the tech sector is very favourable.

image

What if there is a crash?

There is a possibility that we are about to face GFC 2. However, there is quantitative easing available for the government to correct for any downturn.

Convention economic theory states that printing money makes no difference for an economy because it is offset by inflation. However, I believe this is not the case.

As the government prints money, it uses printed money to buy up bonds and effectively lower interest rates. As interest rates go down, businesses borrow more, expand, and produce more. This higher output should push prices down.

Even if there is inflation as a result of money printing, this is not necessarily harmful for the economy. Inflation will push up the price of shares, bonds, and property, which will increase wealth.

Higher inflation will also encourage hard work. If the price of food were to double, wouldn’t you work harder just to survive?

How to invest in the American tech sector

Americans can buy shares directly in, say, Apple or Google. There are also ETFs available that invest in the entire sector.

For Australians, buying American shares directly is difficult and costly, so ETFs are the best option. An ETF I use is the Betashares Nasdaq 100 ETF that trades on the ASX under ticker symbol NDX.

Am I Misanthrophic?

I hate people. I am a misanthrope. There are times I feel lonely, and when people keep telling me how important it is to have friends and companionship, I give in and make an effort to make friends. When at work, I’d build relationships because everyone knows it’s important to network.

image

But inevitably when I try to integrate myself into the world, I am so repulsed by how vulgar people are that I would quickly isolate myself again. I won’t make contact with my friends ever again, and if they invite me over, I’d reject a few times just to make it clear that I don’t want their friendship.

And I’d be lonely again, but it’s a comforting loneliness. When I think of how bad people are, it makes me thankful that I am isolated.

Of course, if you isolated yourself completely, you’d need to quit work, and if you have bills to pay then you’re out of luck because you have to work to make money. Work is a necessary evil.

Luckily, I have a job, and the job is not too bad. At work, I pretty much keep to myself and don’t get too involved in anything. I try not to make friends with anyone at work. I understand from experience that deep friendship at work can have bad outcomes.

I don’t mind working at the moment. I will continue to work, I will continue to save up, and I will see how long I can last in this organisation before they kick me out.

We live in a crazy world filled with evil people, and it’s important for everyone to have the ability to isolate himself from the world and live like a hermit if he wishes to. Sometimes you feel so drained by humanity that you absolutely must check out and live by yourself. This is what I plan to do. As I said many times already, I think I can currently live off interest and dividends, but only if I live in a country like Thailand, so I will continue to work and save and to accumulate recreational leave, and when thing get really painful for me, when I cannot take the world, then I will take a very long holiday, maybe two to four months off. I just want to see if I can live off interest in another country all by myself. Only then will I know that I can really be independent.

Fear of Being Fired and Fear of the Future

Today is Sunday. Last night I stayed up until three in the morning. I woke up today at nine, which means I got six hours of sleep, which is not good. It would explain why I feel so horrible today. I don’t want to sleep in because I know I’ll have trouble waking up early tomorrow for work. I know poor sleep increases cortisol and destroys muscle. I had a lunch catch up with a friend booked in today, but I didn’t feel like going, so I texted him and told him I was busy. I didn’t get into the detail. He seemed cool with it.

It’s all hitting me, I suppose–my girlfriend ignoring me, my career completely stagnating, my lack of sleep, my lack of good friends. I’ve recently been mulling over in my head a new income goal. I currently earn $80k a year in income. About $5k of that is from investments (conservative estimate) and $75k is from my salary. I aim to increase gross income from all sources by $5k per year. This means next year I should be earning $85k and the year after that I’ll be earning $90k and so forth. I can increase my income by getting promotions or progression at work, but if that fails (and it probably will) I can save up more and rely on investment income. I am also going to get serious about starting a side business on the internet so I can earn money online. I need some goal to keep me motivated otherwise I will start to get lazy and depressed.

I’ve heard rumours at work that senior management will fire a few people in the next few weeks. Supposedly they have a few people they want to target. I can only hope I don’t get fired, but even if I do get fired, it’s not like I love my job or anything. I’m not fully certain what I’ll do if I get fired, whether I’ll hunt for another similar job, start over and do something completely different, or fly over to Asia and retire. There are always options, I suppose, so I don’t have too much fear, and I do have savings. I’ve always been paranoid about the future. I avoided marriage, mortgage, and children for this reason alone. This is the thing about the future: it is always uncertain and scary. You want to give yourself the best opportunity as possible to tackle the future. That means you need good health, no debt, and no massive obligations or commitments.

Love and Frugality

Last night I watched a romantic movie called Before Sunrise. It is about a young boy and girl who meet on a train, get off at Vienna, and spend the night in the city before they need to separate from each other the next day. I thought the movie was absolutely beautiful and I suppose by watching it I feel great loss that I never really fell in love with anyone. I’ve been on quite a few dates (most of which are first dates) and had one relationship that lasted for a year, but otherwise I’ve lead quite a simple life. I would love to fall in love like they do in the movies.

Of course, the frugal side of me tells me that just because something is glamorized in a movie it doesn’t mean I should follow it. Movies, TV shows, books, and other forms of art have a way of making you desire things more and creating greater expectations. Greater expectations normally lead you into spending more money than you otherwise would.

Saving up money is simple. You simply don’t spend much. Of course, if it were this simple, why are most people living under enormous debt? I think it is because most people have high expectations. An average person may earn $50,000 per year, but if his expectations are such that he needs to spend $50,000 per year in order to afford the things he feels he needs, he will not save anything. However, if his expectations are lowered. If he were to suppress his desires such that he can live on $10,000, he’d be able to save much more.

Where do expectations come from? There are two sources: internal and external. Expectations can come from yourself when you tell yourself that you need something or that you don’t need something. But expectations can come from others: friends, girlfriends, TV, movies, salesmen, etc.

When we talk to ourselves, we can try to convince ourselves that we don’t need something that we may desire. To react to external influences, we can avoid friends who spend more than we do.

To suppress feelings of love or desire, it is probably best if I avoid romance movies or books. If I keep watching these movies, I desire more.

The point I am making is that love is the tool that other people use to make you desire something, and desire leads to greater expectation, and this normally leads to greater spending. Marketers try to make you love a product so that you buy it. Women try to make you love them so that you spend money on them. It is sad then that in order to be successfully frugal that you must suppress your love. They say love is a beautiful thing, and it can be, but when I look at all the examples of love in the real world, I have trouble separating acts of love from acts of greed, envy, or hedonism. From one perspective, love is beautiful, but look at a different perspective and love is also vile or vulgar.

Can I live a life without love or desire? I doubt it. I am willing to spend money to pursue love, but it must be controlled.

About this blog

Where to start? I am a beta male. I am really unhappy about it. I’ve set up this blog to describe my journey from a pathetic beta male into a proud alpha male. For much of my life, I was a beta male. People looked down upon me. People told me what to do, and I complied. I’ve reached that point in my life where I’ve realized that enough is enough. I’ve made a conscious decision to strike back and become an alpha male. My plan is simple: I will proactively seek to be around people I like, and I will be obnoxious and rude to people I don’t like thereby cutting these negative people from my life. I have already joined the gym. My personal trainer has set an exercise program for me that I am following. It is a great injustice in this world that the weak and the nice are trampled upon. I am sure I am not the only victim. I write this blog not only to motivate myself to stay on track but to also provide support and motivation to readers out there who are in the same situation I am in. If you are a beta male, you need to recognise this problem and you need to take steps to address it. I feel it is my purpose in life to not only make myself stronger but to help others out there become stronger as well.

I’ve learned over time that this world is characterised by oppression. Powerful beings oppress weaker being, whether it is humans oppressing animals for food or clothes or even powerful humans oppressing and exploiting weaker humans.

While slavery via whips and chains has vanished from most parts of the world, a more efficient form of slavery thrives: debt slavery.

By evolution or by design, men are pressured or programmed to go to school, go to university, leave home, date a girl, get a job, get married, get a mortgage, have children, and retire at seventy.

These major life events force us to spend excessively, and we are plunged into debt. Because we are indebted, we are slaves to our lenders. We left home thinking we would become independent only to find ourselves dependent and enslaved to the bank and to our employer.

There must be a better way, but before we find that better way, we must first escape from the system that attempts to enslave us. This blog is about escaping from wage slavery. Anyone can escape wage slavery by working hard and shunning societal pressure to spend. Don’t marry, live with your parents, and save aggressively so that you can live off the interest, rent, and dividends from your globally diversified investments.

Don’t become a slave to the banks. You don’t have to make mortgage payments every month. Don’t become a slave to the landowner. Don’t become a slave to your employer. Don’t become a slave to social customs and traditions.

Do not become a slave to other people. Don’t give anyone the power to tell you what to do.